Category: Quick Post

Testing out Project Honolulu

Recently I have been testing out something new – Project Honolulu from Microsoft. I first heard about this on Twitter (thanks to Eric @XenAppBlog), and was interested in what it could offer straight away. Project Honolulu is a new way to manage Windows Server – using a web based method, that does not rely on the traditional Server Manager GUI. Functionality is similar, and offers the usual range of configuration options, as well the ability to manage roles and features as you would normally expect.

You can download Project Honolulu here. Windows Server 2016 is supported natively, but for 2012R2 Support, you will need to install WMF5.0 (KB3134758).

Project Honolulu has a number of ways to deploy – but I went with a simple install on a single server within my lab. Once this is completed (it’s an easy next next next done install), you are presented with the following screen, which opens up in your default browser:

From here – we can add server connections. Note: Standalone, Failover Cluster, and Hyper-Converged systems are supported:

After I’d added a few servers from my lab, the main screen appeared as below. You can also import servers from a text file – so an export from AD is possible too:

From here, we can see the status of the servers I have added and then drill down further into the options by clicking on a server name. The overview screen gives the usual range of information we’d expect to see:

Particularly nice – is the metric display, which gives an overview of CPU, Memory, Ethernet, and Disk Activity. This is realtime data – but useful for monitoring key servers/clusters, perhaps on an Ops display board or large screen etc.:

As well as a range of metrics available, we have a range of management tools we can take advantage of. Particularly interesting is the ability to manage elements like Network Adaptors, Services, and Roles/Features, as well as to view Event Log entries and the Registry:

Management of Services is also a very useful feature – allowing services to be stopped and started (I wish it had a restart button though!) from the Web Console. This is particularly useful for Managed Service Providers – when the 2am call comes in that a failure has occurred, instead of a VPN into an RDP Session into another RDP Session, you can fire up a Web Interface and restart the service from there (NAT rules and an SSL cert required of course…) :

You’ll notice here that I’ve highlighted a couple of Citrix Services too – Project Honolulu allows you to manage all services running on a supported machine. So this is great for managing 3rd Party applications and services too. The lightweight nature of the system also means that this can be added to existing systems with ease (a single installer and a list of servers).

I’m really interested to see where this Project will go – in particular, it makes the use of Server Core much more accessible, because a familiar and common interface can be used for management of multiple servers. It also allows simple management of basic server configurations, as well as Service management for Microsoft and Third Party applications. Any environment could probably benefit from a single interface that allows basic configuration and Service restarts… the key questions is… where will this Project go next?

I’d really like to see support for more configuration changes, for example, customisable PowerShell options (e.g. this button in the interface runs this remote command) or support for a PowerShell session via the Web Interface. Also it would be great to see support for Third Party software – for example, additional modules that could be included to provide web based management of other software items on the server.