Tags: Azure Storage

Azure Storage Sync – the easiest branch office file sync solution?

Azure Storage Sync provides the means to synchronise files from various locations into an Azure Storage account and to endpoints running the Azure Storage Sync agent. In this post I will give a quick overview of how it can be setup to service branch office requirements whereby VPN connectivity does not exist. For further information see here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/storage/files/storage-sync-files-planning. Here’s my environment which I will be testing with:

Both of my “Branch offices” are actually VMs running on my home lab – but on isolated networks, so they can only communicate outbound to the internet with no LAN access.

Essentially – the goal for this article is to show how to configure Azure Storage Sync to replicate files between Branch Office 1 and Branch Office 2, using Azure Storage as the intermediary.

There are a number of key components to this deployment:

  • An Azure Storage Account – this is where our file share will be hosted
  • An Azure File Share – this is where our replicated data will reside
  • An Azure Storage Sync Group – this is where the synchronisation will be configured and managed
  • Two installations of the Azure Storage Sync Agent that will sit on our Branch Office servers

To start, I have created a folder on Branch Office 1 called “HeadOfficeDocs” – this is the folder that I want to replicate, and it contains a couple of folders and files of “business data” that we need replicated across to Branch Office 2:

Next – we need to setup an Azure Storage account, and an Azure File Share to host the data. First up, I will create a storage account:

Once this has been deployed we can create a File Share – this is where our replicated data will reside:

Next we create a file share and give it a quota:

Once this has been created, we can setup the synchronisation! To do this, we need to create a new Azure File Sync resource:

And fill in a few details – note that the location should be the same as where your Azure File Share is hosted:

Once this has been created, we can access the Storage Sync Resource and create a Sync Group:

A Sync Group defines the sync topology that will replicate our files – so if you require different sets of data replicated then you will need to use different sync groups. For example we could sync completely different sets of data, but on the same or different file servers, in completely different locations, using the same Storage Sync Resource, but separate Sync Groups. This provides plenty of flexibility, and the option use the local file servers (in our Branch sites) to act as a cache for the Azure File Share, and thus reduce the amount of data that is replicated within the topology: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/storage/files/storage-sync-cloud-tiering

Creating the Sync Group is easy – just a few basic details to fill in; the Storage Account we have created, and the File Share that will host the data:

Once this is completed – we have the basics for our topology in place, and we need to register our first server into the topology. The registered servers pane will be blank at this point, as we have not yet installed the Azure File Sync Agent onto any Servers:

To start the process – log onto the first server and download the Azure File Sync Agent from this URL: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=57159. Installation of the File Sync Agent is straightforward and simple – just keep clicking next (you can input proxy settings if you require)… the only configuration is the account we wish to associate the server to, which is completed after setup:

Just click “Sign in” and then follow the instructions – you’ll need to sign into your Azure account, and will then be prompted to select the Azure Subscription, Resource Group, and Storage Sync Service we are registering this server to:

Once this is done – just click “Register”. (You may get prompted to sign in again here – I did) – once completed, the registration process is completed:

Our newly registered server now shows up in the “Registered Servers” pane:

Next we need to configure the Sync Group – so that this server is added and starts to replicate data into our topology. To do this, browse to the Sync Group settings:

From here, we can add the server:

This is just a case of selecting the server from a drop down, and then entering the path where our data exists. Note – I am not using Cloud Tiering here as I want all data on all replication points within the topology:

Once this is done – our server is added to the Sync Group, initially it will show as provisioning, then pending, and then as healthy:

If we now look in the Azure File Share – we can see that the data from the server has been replicated into the Cloud:

So – we now have a single server in a replication topology between itself and an Azure File Share. If I add a new folder to the Branch Server – we see this replicated onto the Azure File Share after a short time:

Next – I will deploy the Agent to a new server (in another Branch) to test out the replication and initial sync. To do this it’s just a case of installing the Agent exactly as we did before – and ensuring that we register this server to the same Storage Sync Service. Once this has been completed, we register the server again (exactly as before – but with a different path if required) and then we will start seeing data being synchronised:

Note that I have used a different path – you can change this on a per server basis if you require, so there is no need to have all servers setup in an identical disk arrangement. If we look in the Sync Group pane after a short while for the sync to take place, we can see both servers are setup:

We can also see that the data has been replicated to the 2nd Server I have added:

Bingo – we now have a working topology that will keep data in sync between our offices using Azure File Sync. No VPNs required, no complicated configuration, just two Agent installations, and some basic Azure Configuration. This provides a simple and effective way to keep branch site data in Sync and provides a number of potential use cases whereby complicated setups would otherwise be required.

Until next time, Cheers!